Expand Your Mind 2017 Classes

MITY classes allow you to engage in a high level of learning with other students—without focusing on grades.

“MITY exceeded our expectations on every level: academic, teacher interaction and knowledge, overall environment and peer interactions!"
MITY parent 2015

Expand Your Mind 2017 Classes

Students take one class per session (tuition is for one session.) Click on the class title to see the course description, information about the teacher and if the class is (FULL) at this time.



Session A: June 19 – June 30

Math, Science, Technology

Humanities

Arts

Session B: July 10 – July 21

Math, Science, Technology

Humanities

Arts

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Expand Your Mind Class Descriptions

Session A: Math, Science,Technology

Algebra and Trigonometry: Gateway to Calculus
This comprehensive and challenging course prepares the students for the SAT and ACT as well as calculus. It is structured to meet the ever-increasing demands of the mathematics classroom and the ever-increasing variety in the needs and interests of students. Function is the underlying and unifying concept of almost every topic in this course: polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and circular. Language is clarified by concisely worded definitions and explanations. The greatest contribution a course at this level can make to learning calculus is to provide a firm foundation through topics such as limit and continuity. This course is designed to challenge and motivate students who want to deepen and expand their knowledge of mathematics.
Abdomohammed Karimi: BS math, U of Jondi Shahpour; BS, aerospace and mechanical engineering, U of MN; MA, math and physical science, U of St. Thomas…currently teaches math and AP physics at Como Park HS, St. Paul.

Biomedical Science and Technology (This Class is currently full. Student requests will go on a waitlist)
Ever wonder how doctors could diagnose from an MRI? But really, how big are the magnets in them? More than just anatomy and physiology, let's take a look at the technologies that help us understand the human body. From running an autopsy-dissection to practicing suturing let's learn about your own physiology, read case studies, and discuss medical device designs. This session will help you solve some of the pressing issues in the medical field, and hopefully help you find answers to some of life's most interesting medical questions.
Kirsten Hoogenakker: BS Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Biophysics from the U of MN, MA Education from University of St. Thomas. Currently teaching Engineering and Biomedical Science at Benilde-St. Margaret's school in St. Louis Park and heads up the International RoboCup Rescue Team and Destination Imagination at BSM.

Chemistry is a Blast! (This Class is full)
Explore the world of chemistry in an outstanding Macalester lab. In two short weeks, you will investigate many of the topics reserved for high school chemistry. You will experiment with wondrous materials and find out what makes them tick. You will discover the balancing forces of nature. You will take a look into the nature of matter itself. This class is all about labs: Develop your fingerprints with iodine! Freeze marshmallows with dry ice! Measure the energy content of different foods by burning them! Titrate vinegar to measure its acid content! Dissolve styrofoam! Create slime! Bring your questions and your curiosity. When we combine fun experiments with useful information, using a catalyst of curiosity, the product is some real chemistry! Will there be explosions? YES!
Jennifer Magdal: BS, Chemistry, University of MN, M.Ed., University of MN. Teaches 9th grade forensics/physical science and IB chemistry at St. Louis Park Senior High.

Electricity and Engineering
Every day we interact with hundreds of electronic devices without thinking about it. This hands-on course will show how electronics and mechanics are used to engineer solutions to the world’s problems. Specifically, we will investigate one of the more interesting applications in engineering: robotics. We will also explore questions such as: How do circuits work; how do magnets convert electricity to motion; how do linkages achieve a desired motion? Also, there will be an introduction to the various engineering disciplines and the roles engineers play in high-tech organizations. If you have ever looked at electronics or mechanisms and wondered, “How does that work?” this will be the class for you. Hopefully you will come away with some answers and a lot more questions.

Math and Programming: Let the Games Begin!
Did you ever wonder how that video game was really made? In this class you will uncover the mystery behind video games and create one of your very own. It will be complete with tunnels, ramps, and whatever else you can dream up. Yes, this class is all about games. Did I mention Mini golf? Bring your putter and Let the Games Begin! So, where’s the math? It’s everywhere! We will use algebra topics to move the ball, and geometry to bounce it off the wall. Throw in some linear equations, Pythagorean theorems, random integers, and inequalities and we all start to see the math method behind the madness of programming. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or instructor’s approval. Please bring your own TI83 or TI84 if you have one.
Scott Greseth: BA, mathematics and accounting, Luther College; MA, education, U of St. Thomas… Middle School Math teacher at Maplewood MS…currently high potential coordinator and teaches advanced math at Maplewood MS.

Physics Phenomena
This class explores how and why objects move the way they do. Spend the time to learn what the laws of Physics mean and then apply them, pick them apart, and experience their implications. We will examine the simplest sorts of motion, figure out the forces involved and apply them to real life situations. Why do you feel the way you do when riding a high-speed elevator? How fast is a roller coaster? Does gravity act the same on all bodies? How do rockets actually work, and can you build one that will actually launch? Your mathematical skills will be honed with actual data, collected with a variety of equipment. Field trips to a local amusement park and other off-campus activities are anticipated. The prerequisite for this course is completion of one year of Algebra.
Bob Murphy: BS Astrophysics and MEd Science Education. 32 years of physics teaching experience both in MN and overseas. Currently teaching IB/AP Physics at St. Paul Central High School.

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Session A: Humanities

All Roads Lead to Rome: An Introduction to Latin and to Roman Culture
Is Latin a dead language? Minime! That’s Latin for “No way!” Latin and the culture of ancient Rome are very much alive in our own language and society. In fact, 60% of the English language comes from Latin. Using the Cambridge Latin course, we will learn the fundamentals of the Latin language with special emphasis on word roots, suffixes, prefixes and vocabulary building. We will also study ancient Roman—its art, songs, customs, architecture and myths. An “architectural scavenger hunt” in downtown St. Paul and a visit to the Minneapolis Institute of Art’s art collection will be two highlights of this course. An authentic Roman banquet will be the culmination of this course!
Mary Rossini: BA Classical Studies, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, Latin Ed/English Ed. U of MN; MA candidate in English, U of MN …currently teaching at Edina High School.

Creative Writing: It’s Time-for-a-little-something…
Feeling Eleven O’Clockish? Join us for lazy afternoons by streams and wild adventures in windstorms. Find the magical pine forest, which cannot be counted even when a rope is tied around each tree after it is counted, and play Pooh-sticks and jump and play and knock over chairs.
Your friends (bears of Very Little Brains) will be there, along with Kanga and Roo and Owl (who knows the long words) and Rabbit (who might someday learn that the best poems cannot be found but must be let to come) and even Eeyore (himself a talented and humble poet)
Your heffalumps and scary sounds will find their place in stories and scenes where Tigger can bounce and Piglet might not think it is such a Bad Idea.
We will end our time together by making a book, where faithful stories can go on being faithful without having to be told things.
Join us on our exposition into the Hundred Acre Wood!
Kevin Lally: BA English, St. John’s University. When not traveling the world or renovating bathrooms, Kevin teaches Language Arts at Cretin-Derham Hall High School.
Susan Vaughan-Fier has a B.A. English, Mount Holyoke College; Ed.M, Harvard School of Education. She currently teaches English at Cretin-Derham Hall High School.

Experimental Economics
Have you ever wondered why people buy bottled water when tap water is just as good? Or why families in Africa typically have many more children, while in wealthier societies like Japan the birthrate is so low. Or why athletes and entertainers get paid so much, while teachers and nurses get paid so little? In this course, you’ll learn that economics is about much more than money, the stock market, unemployment and inflation. It’s about how and why people make the decisions they do. Economists know that we can’t have it all, so we’re constantly facing choices. Study or play outside? Learn piano or guitar? Take a European vacation or buy a new car? In this course, we will use simulations, games, experiments and current events to learn and apply the economic way of thinking. At the end of two weeks, student economists will be experts in analyzing the problem of scarcity and applying it to current economic issues, as well as to their own decision-making processes.
William Betthauser: BA, Finance and Computer Information Systems, University of St. Thomas; MA, Teaching, Bethel University. A native Minnesotan, William teaches Principles of Economics, AP Economics, and technology courses at Bishop O'Connell High School in Arlington, Virginia.

Minnesota History Day (Offered by MN History Center)
If you have created a National History Day project in the past, or know that you will be assigned History Day in the coming school year, or you just love history -- this class is for you! Each student will select a topic based on the 2017 National History Day theme, "Taking a Stand in History." They will then research their topic using the Macalester College Library and create a multimedia presentation as a final project. Along the way students will learn advanced research and writing skills. Field trips will also give students a chance to use other research libraries and learn how history is presented to the public at the Minnesota Historical Society's historic sites and museums. The final project will give students a jump start to History Day, 2017, so start thinking about topics and take a stand for history at MITY this summer!

Psychology: Individuals and Society
Do you like challenging brain teasers? Would you like to discover why seemingly non-violent people participate in riots? Would you like to test your memory? Want to uncover more about your personality? Would you like to learn how to make a person blink each time you say, “rutabaga”? Together through hands-on activities, experiments, case studies, and discussion, this class will explore topics in psychology such as learning, cognition, motivation, emotion, personality, research methods, and social psychology. Come ready to learn more about how humans think and how they function in society.
Rebecca LieffortBA, political science, Hamline University; MA teaching, Hamline University; Doctorate in Education (EdD), Hamline University…taught AP Psychology at Eastview High School in Apple Valley, MN for 9 years…currently observing and cognitively coaching teachers as a Peer Leader for the Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan school district.

Songwriting - Finding Your Voice
Come on a journey of discovery to find your songwriting voice! If you are reading this course description, you likely have a song—or many songs—inside of you waiting to come out. The time, then, has come—and you are invited to join us and let those songs take flight! In this class you will learn the nuts & bolts of songwriting and the poetry and magic in the process. You will write a song each day of this course and you will do a lot of experimenting with your own personal creative style. The ability to play an instrument (or program instruments on computers) you can sing/rap/speak along to would be very helpful in this course—songwriters typically work from a piano or guitar. The goal is to have at least ten new songs by the end of the session – perhaps a collection for your very own first album!
Erik Brandt is a professional songwriter, musician, producer and record label owner. As a solo artist and as the leader of the Urban Hillbilly Quartet, Erik has released 12 albums, toured all over the USA, Canada, the UK and Australia, and has been featured on many television and radio programs. He also teaches English and serves as the IB DP Coordinator at Harding High School in St. Paul, MN. B.A. Macalester College & University of St. Andrews (Scotland). M.A. Liberal Studies – Hamline University. Erik is a National Board Certified English Teacher.

The Presidency
Should the president alone decide whether to deploy nuclear weapons? What powers does the constitution give the president and what powers have presidents simply taken? How have presidential communication styles changed over time? These key questions among others frame the American Presidency in a historical perspective. We will examine the powers of the office with an emphasis on foreign policy, its place in the American imagination, and the achievements of the most significant presidents. Students will be pick a president and “campaign” for that person’s place on Mt. Rushmore. In addition, students will imagine themselves as modern presidents tasked with promoting their vision to voters, and strategize ways to get their agendas through Congress. Students will look at the pageantry, personality, and politics of the office. The course will explore how politics has evolved in recent U.S. history through the emergence of television, the Internet, and the proliferation of electronic media as a political tool. A significant portion of the class will also examine presidential personalities. The presidency has been compromised of all sorts of people: charming, awkward, and strange.
Jon Peterson: B.A. in History and Political Science, Luther College; M.A. in History Ohio University; Ph.D. in History Ohio University; currently teaches history at St. Paul Academy.

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Session A: Arts

Drawing and Printmaking 

Do you love getting your hands dirty with different materials while trying to draw what’s in front of you?  And what if, after you’ve made that great drawing, you want to make copies of it without using a computer or any other technology tools?  Before the invention of the copy machine, printmaking was the method artists used to make multiple prints of an original artwork.  In this class, students will try their hand at two different art making styles: the focused time of observational and figure drawing with pencil, charcoal, ink and oil pastel and then turning those drawings into multiples through the process of monotypes and relief printmaking. Students will be encouraged to use many art skills as possible to create as well as pay homage to the masters in a field trip to the Minneapolis Institute of the Arts.

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Session B: Math, Science, Technology

Astrophysics: Light, Waves, and the Physics of Stars
Human beings have always been intrigued by the stars in the night sky. How can we claim to know so much about objects that are so far away from our planet? The answer? Astrophysics Examine the science behind “light” and electromagnetic waves. Use Reflection and Refraction to understand how lenses and mirrors work; combine these optical elements to learn about telescopes. Other activities include analysis of the motion of local objects (Moon, Sun, etc) as well as an optional late-night observation session in the Macalester Observatory. Use computer simulations and other resources to learn about how stars form, evolve, and finish their life in our universe. A field trip to the Bunker Hills Wave Pool is anticipated.
Bob Murphy: BS Astrophysics and MEd Science Education. 32 years of physics teaching experience both in MN and overseas. Currently teaching IB/AP Physics at St. Paul Central High School.

Chemistry of Medicine
This introductory course will investigate chemistry as it applies to the study of medicine and drugs. Students will explore inorganic and organic molecules and how they relate to our bodies through the application of biochemistry. This course will include many hands on activities to teach basic chemistry concepts like inter- and intra-molecular forces which will be tied to their applications in medicine. We will explore acid-base chemistry through different forms of antacids. Redox chemistry will be discussed in light of the class of drugs known as depressants. Through hands on experimentation students will explore how to do things like synthesize aspirin and extract caffeine as they learn about the effects of analgesics and stimulants. Students should have a background in basic chemistry.
Jennifer Magdal: BS, Chemistry, University of MN, M.Ed., University of MN. Teaches 9th grade forensics/physical science and IB chemistry at St. Louis Park Senior High.

Electricity and Engineering
Every day we interact with hundreds of electronic devices without thinking about it. This hands-on course will show how electronics and mechanics are used to engineer solutions to the world’s problems. Specifically, we will investigate one of the more interesting applications in engineering: robotics. We will also explore questions such as: How do circuits work; how do magnets convert electricity to motion; how do linkages achieve a desired motion? Also, there will be an introduction to the various engineering disciplines and the roles engineers play in high-tech organizations. If you have ever looked at electronics or mechanisms and wondered, “How does that work?” this will be the class for you.

Forensics – You Can’t Get Away With Anything!!!
How would you like to learn about normal and abnormal brain functions and characteristics of notorious serial killers? Maybe you would like to learn how investigators interrogate suspects. Maybe lying and polygraph techniques interest you. Forensics-You Can’t Get Away With Anything will take you through an in-depth journey exploring such topics as handwriting analysis, blood splatter analysis, the secret art of surveillance, making and breaking secret codes, and much more! A special field trip to the Ramsey County Adult Detention Center where the SWAT team trains will complete the experience. Join us for an exploration of forensics and learn why–You Can’t Get Away With Anything!!!
Mary Hanson:BA, Chemistry, Physics, Physical Science-U of WI-River Falls. Four times recognized in Who's Who Among America's Teachers, and in the National Honor Society-Outstanding America's Teachers-premier publication 2005-2006. Member of NAIS-National Association of Investigative Specialists, SPPD Reserve Police Officer. Currently teaching Chemistry, Pre-AP Chemistry, AP Chemistry, and Forensic Science at Arlington HS, St. Paul.

Pre-Calculus
This course covers topics that traditionally follow an advanced algebra course and are arranged in two broad components:
Component 1 covers elementary functions. These include polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (circular) functions and their combinations. A section covers sequences, series and combinatorial problems, and eventually moves into differential
Component 2 contains a treatment of plane geometry including vectors. The usual work with lines and planes is presented along with concepts dealing with conic sections, other coordinate systems, and parametric representation of curves and surfaces. Prerequisites: Algebra and trigonometry (either completed or taken simultaneously); student must be extremely motivated and a team worker.
Abdomohammed Karimi: BS math, U of Jondi Shahpour; BS, aerospace and mechanical engineering, U of MN; MA, math and physical science, U of St. Thomas…currently teaches math and AP physics at Como Park HS, St. Paul.

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Session B: Humanities

Beginning Debate

Have you ever pictured yourself as a lawyer defending clients or prosecuting an accused person? Can you see yourself persuading the Congress to vote for your proposed law? Do you enjoy learning and arguing about controversial issues? Do you like to win arguments with others and impress your teachers in class debates? You will learn how to research, argue, and speak effectively on controversial issues using different debate formats. You will use your skills to persuade debate judges and convince audiences to accept your ideas. You will gain that will help you in high school, college, your future career and life. This class is for students with little or no debate experience. You should be interested in researching, working with other students, and speaking in front of audiences.
Bob Ihrig:BA history, Macalester College; MA history, MN State U, Mankato… coached high school debate from 1973 to 1999… currently teaching at Mankato West HS.
Gail Sarff: BA, speech and communications, U of Iowa, MA English and education, U of MN…has coached debate for 33 years in Iowa and Minnesota… currently teaching at Wayzata HS.

How to Stop the Madness: The Role of Diplomacy in International Crisis
Think the world is too big to understand and global problems are too far gone to solve? Think again! This course will take you through the complexities of a shrinking global society and will teach you skills to help learn and navigate current international conflicts, crises, and politics. Using techniques specifically designed for the diplomatic simulation competition known as Model United Nations, students will research, debate, and work to resolve major humanitarian and political issues such as human trafficking, nuclear arms proliferation, climate change, and worldwide hunger. There are a lot of problems out there, but it’s not too late to save the world. With up-to-date knowledge of international issues and diplomatic training, you can be one of the solutions!
Nickie McKeever:
B.A. in History and American Racial and Multicultural Studies, St. Olaf College; Grades 5-12 Social Studies Teaching Licensure, Metropolitan State College of Denver; M.A. in Education, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota; currently teaches social studies at Edina High School.

Minnesota a History Day (offered by the MN History Center)
If you have created a National History Day project in the past, or know that you will be assigned History Day in the coming school year, or you just love history -- this class is for you! Each student will select a topic based on the 2017 National History Day theme, "Taking a Stand in History." They will then research their topic using the Macalester College Library and create a multimedia presentation as a final project. Along the way students will learn advanced research and writing skills. Field trips will also give students a chance to use other research libraries and learn how history is presented to the public at the Minnesota Historical Society's historic sites and museums. The final project will give students a jump start to History Day, 2017, so start thinking about topics and take a stand for history at MITY this summer!

Mock Trial and Current Legal Issues

Are you interested in the legal system? Do you enjoy discussing issues? Do you want to improve your public speaking skills? If you do you should take the exciting new course: Mock Trial. Taught by a former trial attorney and a history teacher, this course takes you inside the courtroom, to learn what it’s like to be an attorney, or a witness in this exciting setting. You will spend time exploring fact situations and legal issues, and will participate in two full-length mock trials, one civil and criminal. Guest speakers with experience in competitive mock trial, as well as the legal system will help deepen your understanding. This course is perfect for students interested in performance, debate, speech, or the legal system.

Aaron Shulow holds B.A. in Behavioral Science and Law, UW-Madison, J.D. University of Minnesota Law School and D.E.A. in Constitutional Law, Universidad de Navarra. Aaron teaches at St. Paul Academy and Summit School.

Politics and American Humor: Ben Franklin to Jon Stewart (This class is Cancelled)
In comparison with the rest of the world, the United States is really funny. No, seriously! Since our country has given us the freedom of speech, we have not been afraid to use it. Our history is littered with hilarious people who used humor to speak directly to the American people. We will cover topics including satire news (Colbert, Stewart, Oliver), skits (Saturday Night Live), political campaign advertisements, political cartoons, internet memes, social issue topics and much more! We will explore the humorist, the audience, the form and the content of the text to gain insight into society at the time. After we examine the past, we will spend time creating our own humor. Bloopers, one-liners, and famous insults will also be shared. As a president once accidentally said, “I am a jelly doughnut!” Come find out who said this and more!
Joel Coleman: BA, Social Studies Education, Saint John’s University. MA in Educational Technology from Concordia St. Paul. Currently teaches US History and College Economics at Ubah Medical Academy.

Rise Up! Social Justice in the 21st Century
Patriarchy got you down? Join us for conversation, research, and action on social justice issues important to you. Learn the methods of movements, discuss the evolution of the revolution, practice social justice engagement.
We’ll hone our skills as social justice warriors through conversation, workshops, skits, reading, writing, art projects, movies, podcasts, guest speakers, site visits, and much much more. This class is about your passions, and your skills. After learning about social justice movements, you will put your passion to work in a social justice project.
From the Umbrella Revolution in Hong Kong and the Anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa to the Arab Spring and #BlackLivesMatter, popular social movements are changing the world. If you want to be a part of the next revolution, this class is for you!
Kevin Lally: BA English, St. John’s University. When not traveling the world or renovating bathrooms, Kevin teaches Language Arts at Cretin-Derham Hall High School.

Write Stuff: Produce, Polish and Publish
Get to write, including in a college computer lab. Get your creative writing abilities stretched. Get how to break through writer’s block. Get to look at it again and again to make it better (ReReRe*Vision). Get constructive feedback from a professional writer. Conference. Get to meet with a professional editor. Get fellow young writers who love to write. Leave with ideas and experience and confidence. Leave with your writing polished and ready to publish, a professional cover letter, a list of names and addresses of likely markets looking for YOUR writing. Leave a submission package in the mailbox. Leave the world changed.
Jack Kreitzer: BS, U of SD, Medical School, U of SD….rumored to be the secret identity of Wordman, is a poet, educator, and catalyst…published six volumes of poetry, taught creativity at universities. Currently working as a writing specialist and artist-in-residence in Minnesota schools.

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Session B: Arts

Architecture and Place
When people buy and furnish a home, or when they make a space on a table to do homework, or find a seat on the bus, they are constructing places that meet their emotional and physical needs. Architects do the same things, with more permanent materials. This course will introduce students to how architects see the world, and the tools they use to study it. Students will explore architecture through drawing, model making and critical questioning. Studio reviews, an opportunity for students to present and review work, will introduce students to the vocabulary of architecture: site, material, structure, scale, form, and space. Students are challenged to see inside their work. What is it like to be there? Past field trips include visits to a home by Frank Lloyd Wright, and a public space by Maya Lin.
Ted MacLeod: BA, Mathematics, Studio Arts, Magna Cum Laude, Macalester College; M of Arch., U of MN. 15 years in Architectural practice.

Improvisation Project
Come try a class where our work is our play! We’ll think on our feet, have fun meeting new people and nurture our imaginations while creating theatre out of thin air. There’s singing, dancing, stage combat, acting challenges, and comedic stunts of astonishing proportions! We take a group of diverse people who may not know each other or know a lot about improvisation, and in two short weeks, we’re performing a completely improvised show together like we’ve been a troupe for years. A great choice for the budding or seasoned actor, but also for anyone who wants to experience fresh and useful ways of interacting with new friends, The Improvisation Project is an event!
Nicole Kronzer: BFA theatre, U of WI—Stevens Point, Education, U of MN—Twin Cities…long-time professional improvisational actor and teacher in the Twin Cities with such groups as the Brave New Workshop, The Great American History Theatre, Stevie Ray’s Comedy Troupe, and Gremlin Theatre…currently teaching English and directing plays at Champlin Park HS, Champlin, MN.

Opera OnStage with The Baldwin Sisters
From the Latin OPERA, meaning “work, effort” Do you dare to daydream about life on stage or on camera? Bring your daring and your dreams to Opera OnStage -- a rare, two-week intensive camp designed to awaken your voice, your mind, and your body smarts for the physicality required of today's live performer. Christina Baldwin and Jennifer Baldwin Peden are two of the most prolific and celebrated artists in Minnesota (check out their amazing bios on MITY’s faculty page!). What do they love most of all? Opera and its first cousins, operetta and music theater. This is a camp of songs and scenes from the musical stage, brought to life through new skills you will learn from two professional actor/singers who are also passionate teachers. Whether this is your first time on stage or you are a seasoned veteran at a young age, the Baldwins will coach you to higher levels of performance, grow your courage, and nurture the two qualities every professional needs in great measure: humility and persistence. Opera OnStage will culminate in an exhilarating performance in the glorious Macalester performance hall for MITY students, and your family and friends. If you are ready to make those daydreams come to life next summer, bring your willingness to sing your guts out, work hard, and enjoy some serious play with Opera OnStage.
Jennifer Peden, Christina Baldwin

Painting: color comes alive!
Welcome painters! This course covers the fundamentals of painting, including composition, color theory, tone, texture, and spatial perspective. During the first part of the day we will paint from direct observation of the still life and landscape. During the second part we will work on in-depth, multi-step assignments that favor process and investigation. The aim of the class is to acquire critical painting skills and to develop a personal visual language through experimentation and self-expression. A visit to the Minneapolis Institute of Art is planned. Students, you will use your talent, interest, and dedication to create work that is both meaningful to you and stimulating to the eye and mind.
Keren Kroul: BA Fine Arts, Brandeis University; MFA Painting, Parsons School of Design. Practicing visual artist, recipient of a 2015 MN State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant, named 2017 Jerome Emerging Artist at the Rochester Art Center. Currently teaches painting at Augsburg College and the Minnetonka Center for the Arts.

 
 

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